NOV 3 0 T954

O F TH E

UNIVERSITY Of ILLINOIS

796.05

FO

v. 65

^°P-1

The oerson charging this material is re¬ sponsible for its rlturn to the Ubra^rom which it was Withdrawn on or before Latest Date stamped below.

THett, mutilation, and

for disciplinary action and may result the University.

=1TSS.- msssz

WITH ILLUSTRATION SUPPLEMENT

PRICE, TEN CENTS

SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 1907.

VOL. LXVI1I.— No. 1.

FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING CO., 346 Broadway, New York

Entered as second class matter .July 10, 1906, at the Post Office, New York, N.Y.

[THE AUERHAHN AT HOME

From a Painting by Carl Zimmermann

2

FOREST AND STREAM.

[Jan. s, 1907.

Motor Boats, Row Boats, Hunting and Fishing Boats

Mullins Steel Boats

built of steel with air chambers in each end like a life boat. Faster, more buoyant, practically indestructible, don'tleak, dry out and are absolutely safe. They can’t sink. No calking, no bailing, no trouble.

Every boat is guaranteed. Highly en-

dorsed by sportsmen The ideal boat for Wplte fol, Catalogue,

pleasure, summer resorts, parKs, etc. ^

THe W. H . Mullins Company, 126 FranRlinSt., Salem, Ohio

THIS WINTER.

WILL SEE MORE BOATS BUILT THAN EVER BEFORE

SAIL/ ^nd POWER

Avoid those vexatious delays in the spring. Be wise start your work early.

MANHASSET SHIPBUILDING <a REPAIR CO.

BUILDERS OF SAIL AND POWER. CRAFT,

Marin© Railways. Winter Storage.

PORT WASHINGTON, L. I., N. Y.

*

IF YOU ARE BUILDING A NEW BOAT

and. want the greatest possible SPEED, as well as com¬ fort and pleasure, or if you have a boat which has not developed the pace you expected, buy a new 1906 model

CUSHMAN ENGINE.

It never disappoints. It always makes good. Simplest and most powerful engine. Valveless; cylinder water jacket and head cast in one piece. The CUSHMAN MOTOR holds m-any speed records. Single and double cylinders, 2 to 20 H. P. Send for illustrated descriptive booklet of this remarkable engine.

CUSHMAN MOTOR COMPANY, Lincoln, Neb

DAN KIDNEY SON, West De Pere, Wis.

lilders of fine Pleasure and Hunting Boats, Canoes, soline Launches, Small Sail Boats. Send for Catalogue.

KNOCK DOWN BOATS

Launches, row and sail boats.

Canoes and Hunting boats.

Send for Catalogue.

Of all Descriptions.

marlcan Boat & Machine Co.. 3517 S. 2nd St., St. Louis, Mo.

Canoe and Boat Building.

A Complete Manual for Amateurs. _ Containing plain and comprehensive directions for th*e construction of canoes, rowing and sailing boats and hunting craft. By W. P. Stephens. Cloth. Seventh and enlarged edition. 264 pages. Numerous illustrations and fifty plates in envelope. Price, $2.

FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING CO.

Canoe Cruising and Camping,

By Perry D. Frazer. Cloth. Illustrated. Price, $1.00.

Full of practical information for outdoor _ people, whether they travel in canoes, with pack animals or carry their outfits on their own backs.

FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING CO.

*a journaL of outdoor life. '

TRAVEL. NATURE STUDY SHOOTING, FISHING. YACHTING

CORRESPONDENCE.

The Forest and Stream is the recognized medium of entertainment, instruction and information between American 'sportsmen. The editors invite communications on the subjects to which its pages are devoted. Anony¬ mous communications will not be regarded. The editors are not responsible for the views of correspondents.

SUBSCRIPTIONS.

Subscriptions may begin at Any time. Terms: For single copies, $3 per year, $1.50 for six months. Rates for clubs of annual subscribers:

Three Copies, $7.50. Five Copies, $12.

Remit by express money-order, registered letter, money order or draft payable to the Forest and Stream Publish¬ ing Company. The paper may be obtained of news¬ dealers throughout the United States, Canada and Great Britain.

Foreign Subscriptions and Sales Agents London: Davies & Co., 1 Finch Lane; Sampson, Low & Co.; Paris: Brentano’s. Foreign terms: $4.50 per year; $2.25 for six months.

ADVERTISEMENTS.

Inside pages, 20 cents per agate line. Special rates for three, six and twelve months, Eight words to the line, fourteen lines to one inch. Advertisements should be received by Saturday previous to issue in which they are to be inserted. Transient advertisements must in¬ variably be accompanied by the money, or they will not be inserted. Reading notices, seventy-five cents per line. Only advertisements of an approved character inserted.

Display Classified Advertising.

Hotels, Summer and Winter Resorts, Instruction, Schools, Colleges, etc. Railroad and Steamship Time Tables. Real Estate For Sale and To Let. Seeds and Shrubs. Taxidermists. The Kennel, Dogs, etc. Wants and Exchanges. Per Agate line, per insertion, 15 cents. Three months, 13 times, 10 cents per line.

FOREST AND STREAM PUB. CO.,

346 Broadway, New York.

ROPING A COUGAR.

I went out recently for a beef steer and fol¬ lowed a course up Cougar Canon. What did I find but a lion track in the snow, the snow being six inches to two feet deep in the drifts, so I could easily track the lion. Then I began to wish for my gun, but I followed along the track, and in about a mile I came to a calf he had killed about three days ago.

He had just left this calf, I could see, on the run, so I went on after him at a gallop. It was a very rough country, but in a mile I got sight of Mr. Lion. He was leaping along, seem¬ ing to go about thirty feet to a jump. Then down came my lasso and I began to flank my horse with it.

He had scented the lion and did not want to face the music, but the lasso and rfiy spurs made him go on up toward the lion. When within about thirty feet of the lion I made a throw with the lasso and caught him fair around the neck, then took my turns. The lion grabbed the rope in his teeth, but the horse was wild with fright, and with me giving him the rein and the spur he made such a hot pace that lion never gained his feet, and was turned end over end so he let loose of th’e lasso, and I never let him get his feet again until he was dead.

The lasso has the . teeth marks where he grabbed it. Any one can search this hide for a bullet hole. If anyone thinks I shot the animal I will hold this hide to let him' examine it. Then I want to sell it. The head is on, and the feet up to its knees. The lion was seven feet from the tip of the nose to the tip of the tail, and stood three feet high— M. Pulsipher, in the Salt Lake City Evening News.

WINTER FISHING.

How many of ’the thousands of fishermen who sail back and forth in the waters about Greater New York from early May until late _ September realize that fishing the year around is a hobby with scores of residents of the city.

One of the coldest days of a very cold winter a matter of business called a newspaperman to Long Beach. He was obliged to make his way as best he could beyond the dreary barn of the great hotel, which looked bare and forbidding in its solitude, to a cottage located to the east of the hotel building. .

There was a little snow on the ground, an ( Continued on page 5.)

SPAR. COATING

is used by those yacht builders who have a reputa¬ tion they intend to keep. The most expensive var- nhh is the varnish that does not last long and leaves the boat unprotected The cheapest, because it is the best, is Edward Smith & Co’s Spar Coating it was used on the International yacht cup winners— on the “Queen,” the “Vim,” etc., etc. Its initial cost may be a little more than some, but in the long run it is by far the most economical.

80 Years’ Experience in Every Can

EDWARD SMITH <$L COMPANY

59 Market Street 45 Broadway

Chi'cago New York

FOREST AND STREAM

abundance of sun and a deluge of wind, which seemed to be playing hide and seek with itself by blowing from almost every point of the com¬ pass at once.

Out on the ocean sands, where the sun at least simulated warmth upon the white beach, a soli¬ tary figure paced slowly along, fishpole in hand, line somewhere out in the breakers, and eyes straight out to sea, forgetful of the wind, the cold, the season and everything else, possibly ex¬ cept the hooking of a fish.

Curiosity prompted a visit to the lone watch¬ man of the pebbles on the shore, and much to the surprise of the intruder the solitary fisher¬ man was discovered to be none other 'than one of the most zealous disciples of Izaak Walton, who lives on Manhattan Island. After reaching the shore line it was ascertained that he was not alone, for both to the east and to the west there were other figures, at long intervals, pacing methodically along the water line, reeling in after a cast with as much zeal as if it were mid¬ summer and they were assured of at least one strike every fifteen minutes.

After the first exclamations of astonishment had subsided, when fisherman and visitor recog¬ nized one another, the man with the line con¬ fessed that he made at least one visit monthly during the winter to Long Beach, whenever he thought he could find an onshore breeze and a little sun, and he insisted that in five years, or so his luck had been good enough to repay him for his trouble.

But Long Beach is not the only place for win¬ ter sport. The fishermen of Babylon are always on the lookout for the cold weather anglers, and so long as the steamers run o<ut to the fishing banks, there will always be somebody on board to try for cod and ling. Occasionally, too, there are fishermen, not far from Central Park and 104th street, who have been known to travel to the lakes within forty miles of New York, and after fishing- half the day through the ice return with tales that are worth telling— and occasionally some fish. New York Telegram.

SHAD ACCOUNTED FOR.

Engineers report that the Hudson River is bottomless. Oh, well ! That’s where the shad have gone. New York Evening Telegram.

The Forest and Stream may be obtained from any nezusdealer on order. Ask your dealer to supply you regularly.

7 A

THE >UN NEVEl

SETS ON THE ,

__ JEMENTL

Collar buttons

,USED THE WORLD OVER.

by those who know where they get the most for their money. Made of one piece- of metal. Easy to button and unbutton. Stay- buttoned. They out¬ wear any other button and the rolled plate never wears off like other plated buttons. Also made in Gold and Sterling. If dam¬ aged in any way, exchange it for new one. At all jewelers and haberdashers.

^ ^ Send for Story of Collar Button. KREMENTZ ®. CO.,

94 Chestnut St. ,

^Newark, N. J.

< sTF'Ff

FISHING RODS

THE BEST CATCH OF THE SEASON

may be yours for a “trophy.” If you get a strike, you’ll land your fish, if yours is a “BRISTOL” Steel Rod. The most reliable and finest rod made, and popular with leading fishermen of all countries.

We originated the steel rod nearly 20 years ago. Our faith in its reliability is such that we give an absolute guarantee for THREE YEARS with each rod against breakage due to defective material or poor workmanship. The trade mark “BRISTOL” is stamped on every reel seat. Look for it.

Send to-day for our beautiful catalog. Mailed free. Handsome 1907 Calendar mailed for 10c. in silver.

THE HORTON MFG. CO., 84 Horton St.. Bristol, Conn., U. S. A.

Shooting Jackets

Heavy All-Wool Guaranteed, in one quality only, and that a good one. Just the article for Duck Shooters and Trap Shooters. Two colors dead grass, Oxford gray.

rn ini rc nicru 318-320 Fulton St.. tnAKLLj illovtl, BROOKLYN. N. Y.

Get my prices on any Gun you may want before ordering elsewhere.

Where, When and How to Catch Fish on the East Coast of Florida.

By Wm. H. Gregg, of St. Louis, Mo., assisted by Capt. John Gardner, of Ponce Park, Mosquito Inlet, Fla. With 100 engravings and 12 colored illustrations. Cloth. Illustrated. 268 pages. Map. Price, $4.00.

A visitor to Florida can hardly make the trip without this book, if he is at all interested in angling. It gives a very complete list of the fishes of the East Coast of Florida, and every species is illustrated by a 'cut taken from the best authorities. The cuts are thus -of the most value to the angler who desires to identify the fish he takes, while the colored plates of the tropical fish shown in all their wonderful gorgeousness of coloring, are very beautiful. Besides the pictures of fish, there are cuts showing portions of the fishing tackle which the author uses. A good index completes the volume.

FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING CO.

HITTING vs. MISSING.

By S. T. Hammond (“Shadow”). Cloth. Price, $1.00.

Mr. Hammond enjoys among his field companions the repute of being an unusually good shot, and one who is particularly successful in that most difficult branch of upland shooting, the pursuit of the ruffed grouse or partridge. This prompted the suggestion that he should write down for others an exposition of the methods by which his skill was acquired. The result is this original manual of “Hitting vs. Missing.” We term it original, because, as the chapters will show, the author was self- taught; the expedients and devices adopted and the forms of practice followed were his own. This then may be termed the Hammond system of shooting; and as it was successful in his own experience, being here set forth simply and intelligibly, it will prove not let* effec¬ tive with others.

FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING CO.

Houseboats and Houseboatin£

BY ALBERT BRADLEE HUNT.

A volume devoted to a new outdoor field which has for its purpose three objects:

First— To make known the opportunities American waters afford for enjoyment of houseboating life.

Second To properly present the development which houseboating has attained in this country.

Third To set forth the advantages and pleasures *f houseboating in so truthful a manner that other* may become interested in the pastime.

The book contains forty specially prepared articles by owners and designers of well-known houseboats, and is beautifully illustrated with nearly 200 line and naif-tone reproductions of plans and exteriors and interiors. A most interesting chapter is devpted to houseboating in England.

The book has been carefully prepared by Mr. Albert Bradlee Hunt.

The work is printed on extra heavy coated paper, and i* bound in olive green buckram. The price is $3 net. Postage 34 cents.

FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING CO.

Bears I Ha.ve Met And Others.

By Allen Kelly. Paper. 209 pages. Price, 60 cent*.

After some years of peaceful slumber, Mr. Kelly’* most excellent book of bear stories was roused to life by a recent criticism of Mr. Seton, the question being where Mr. Seton got his material for his bear stories, for * number of people suggested that it was taken from Mr. Kelly’s book. With the merits of this controversy “our¬ selves have naught to do,” but the matter in Mr. Kelly’* book is excellent, interesting and worthy of pretty much any author.

FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING CO.

Building Motor Boasts a^nd Managing Gasolene Engines

are discussed in the book

‘•HOW TO BUILD A LAUNCH FROM PLANS”

A complete illustrated work on the building of motor boats and the installing, care and running of gasolene motors. By Charles G. Davis. With 40 diagrams,

9 folding drawings and 8 full-page plans. Price, postpaid, $1.50.

The author is a builder and designer of national repu¬ tation. All the instruction ' given is definite and com¬ prehensive, 40 diagrams, 9 folding drawings and 8-full- page pldns. That portion of the boat devoted to the use and care of gas engines should be most carefully perused by every individual who operates one. The book is well worth the price asked for it.

FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING CO.

The “Forest and Stream”

TRAP SCORE BOOK

meets the needs of gun clubs and shooters in every par¬ ticular. The 150 sheets are heavily ruled an advantage all scorers will appreciate, particularly when working in a dim light. The horizontal spaces are numbered from 1 to 30. Broad perpendicular lines divide these into groups of five, which aids the eye of the scorer greatly. Similar heavy lines divide the perpendicular spaces into groups of six; thus the squads are distinguished at glance.

The paper manifolds easily, and carbon sheets are placed in the book for that purpose. .

It contains the American Shooting Association Rule* for Live-Bird Shooting, for Double Live-Bird Shooting, for Inanimate Target Shooting, Hurlingham Revi»«d Live-Bird Rules for single and double rises, and the Rose System of dividing purses. Price, $1.

FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING CO.

!

6

FOREST AND STREAM

[Jan. s, 1907.

TARPON TACKLE A SPECIALTY

H. L. Leonard Tarpon Rods I

Wm. Mills (EL Son’s Intrinsic Tarpon Reel Eaualled bv none Wm. Mills (EL Son’s Captiva Tarpon Hooks j =

Wm. Mills (El Son’s Red Spool Tarpon Lines J

SEND rods for repairs now

WILLIAM MILLS SON, 21 Park Place, New York, U. S. A.

THOS. J. CONROY 28

Manufacturer and Denier in . . «

Fine FishingTackle &SportingGoods J'*1

TARPON, TUNA.nnd ALL SOUTHERN TACKLE_ 11 CW 1 OrK

yfr A W We make a specialty of repairing Fish-

mx, 1^ JL JPtL Jl JLx *3 ing Tackle of all kinds and makes.

Deal direct with the manufacturers, the only house in the business that own and con¬ duct their own factory, which is on the premises. Avoid the middleman’s profits and place your work from the beginning into the hands of practical mechanics.

EDWARD VOM HOFE,

95-97 Fulton Street, - New York.

Gold Medal, Highest Award a.t St. Louis, 1904.

Also World's Columbia.n Exposition, Chicago, 1893.

JULIUS VOM HOFE,

FISHING REELS ONLY.

No. 351 South 5th Street, - Brooklyn, N. Y.

A reel with good bearings and screws, oiled once a year, is a durable, well running reel.

Rubber and" Nickel-Plated Single Action Reels, with rubber safety band and sliding click. Made in sizes 40, 60, 80 and 100 yards.

All genuine Reels bear my name. No branch store in any city. Established 1857.

Send stamp for Catalogue.

Men I Have Fished With.

Sketches of character and incident with rod and gun from childhood to manhood; from the killing of little fishes and birds to a buffalo hunt. By Fred Matlier. Illus¬ trated. Price, $2.00.

It was a happy thought that prompted Mr. Fred Mather to write of his fishing companions. The .chapters were received with a warm welcome at the beginning, and have been of sustained interest. The “Men I Have Fished With” was among the most popular stories of papers ever presented to Forest and Stream readers.

FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING CO.

Modern Fishculture in Fresh and SaJt Wetter.

By Fred Mather, author of “Men I Have Fished With,” with a chapter on Whitefish Culture by Hon. Herschel Whitaker, and a chapter on the Pike-Perch by James Nevin. Illustrated. Price, $2.00.

This work covers the entire field, including the culture of trout, salmon, shad, the basses, grayling, whitefish, pike, pickerel, mascalonge, postfish, smelt, crappies, white perch, pike-perch, wall-eyed pike, catfish, carp, alewives, sturgeon, yellow perch, codfish, tomcod, lobsters. With chapters on the parasites, diseases and enemies of fish; also frog culture, terrapins, numbers of eggs in different fish, table of number of eggs in various fishes, the working or blooming of ponds, fishways, fishes which guard their young, how fish find their own rivers, dyna¬ miting a lake, to measure the flow of water.

The purpose of the work is to give such practical in¬ struction as may enable the amateur to build his ponds and breed his trout or other fish after the most approved method and with the best possible promise of success.

FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING CO.

AMERICAN DUCK SHOOTING

By GEORGE BIRD GRINNELL

No single gunner however wide his experi¬ ence, has himself covered the whole broad field of duck shooting, and none knows so much about the sport that there is nothing left for him to learn. Each one may acquire a vast amount of novel information by reading this complete . and most interesting book. It describes, with a portrait, every species of duck, goose, and swan known to North America; tells of the various methods of capturing each, the guns, ammunition, loads, decoys and boats used in the sport, and gives the best account ever published of the re¬ trieving Chesapeake Bay dog.

About 6oo pages, 58 portraits of fowl, 8 full- page plates, and many vigriette head and tail pieces by Wilmot Townsend.

Price, edition de luxe on hand made paper, bound in buckram, plates on India tint paper, each copy numbered and signed by author, $5.00. Price library edition, $3.50.

FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING CO.

FISHING RODS,

Anglers send for Catalogue.

REELS and TACKLE, Snelled Hooks, Leaders, Minnow Gangs and Flies.

NEW CATALOGUE (profusely illustrated) of all grades Fishing Tackle, Reels, Fish Hooks, Silk Worm Gut, Flies, Artificial Baits and every requisite for anglers.

A Full Line of Fly-Tiers’ and Rod-Makers’ Supplies.

Correspondence with Dealers solicited for Trade Prices.

CHARLES PLATH & SON, 62 Fulton St., New York.

Our

1906-1907 Gun Catalogue

Now Ready

Mailed free upon application. Largest and m6st complete assortment of practical, up-to-date goods at lowest prices.

Sporting Goods Exclusively.

We have our own gun repair shop.

YON LENGERKE & ANTOINE

277 and 279 Wabash Avenue, 35, 37 and 39 Van Buren Street, CHICAGO, ILL.

AFLOAT or ASHORE

USE

CORONET RYE

Warranted 8 Years Old Absolutely Pure

1803 Du Vivier Co. 1906

Phone 5223 Corf. 22 Warren St , New York.

When a dealer says that some other Spoon Bait Is as good as G. M. Skinner's, he acknowledges that

G.

M. SKINNER’S

IS THE STANDARD.

For Sale by all Dealers in SPORTING GOODS.

In the floods!

Gold Lion Cocktails

are always ready to serve. They are put up in protected packages convenient for the sportsman to pack.

These cocktails were awarded the gold medal at the Paris Exposition in 1900 on account of their purity and exquisite flavor.

Seven Kinds American, Manhattan, Whiskey, Martini, Tom Gin, Vermouth, Gin.

Be sure that the GOLD LION is on every package of Cocktails you buy.

To be had at all wine merchants and grocers.

THE COOK & BERNHEIMER CO.

New York.

r

[K? ,

f ;

Forest and Stream

A Weekly Journal. Copyright, 1906, by Forest and Stream Publishing Co.

Terms, $3 a Year, 10 Cts. a Copy. I Six Months, $1.50.

NEW YORK, SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 1907.

( VOL. LXVIII.— No. I- ) No. 346 Broadway, New York.

The object of this journal will be to studiously promote a healthful interest in outdoor recre¬ ation, and to cultivate a refined taste for natural

Objects. Announcement in first number of

Forest and Stream, Aug. 14, 1873.

foundland will take up the question of protect¬ ing and turning into a permanent valuable asset the great game and fish resources which it pos¬ sesses. The time to do it is now, not ten years hence.

r^T ^oD/ozp'rrtArT'TV In every land are to De iounu me

NEWFOUNDLAND S OPPORTUNITY. themselves

In every land are to be found men who are

the one founded by Mr. Carnegie should interest itself in. the return to our covers of those natural things that have been exterminated through man s selfishness, and it is still more gratifying when the person chosen to carry on these experiments is one whose eminence in his particular field is unchallenged, as is that of Dr. Hodge.

Within the past few years, the island of New¬ foundland, once so far away, has been made so accessible that it is coming to be a famous re¬ sort for anglers and big game hunters from the ' United States. For hundreds of years the game ' and fish supply of the island has kept up merely because man’s destruction hardly more than equalled the annual increase of the inhabitants of its forests, its barrens and its rivers.

; Now, matters have changed. Newfoundland was not too far away to be reached by the march of improvement, and railroads now offer easy access to regions that once were reached only i by long days of weary foot travel. There can be but one result of this greater accessibility. Un¬ less protective measures are taken, the game and fish will be more and more rapidly destroyed, until a time will come when these great resources j of the island will be so diminished as no longer I to attract the visiting sportsman.

Yet if the people of Newfoundland are wise in time, this diminution may be so long postponed I that the present generation will never suffer from it. The island still possesses vast quantities of f game and fish, and it is necessary only that these supplies should be adequately conserved to enable 1! them to last for generations. Many years ago in the State of Maine, conditions differed not greatly from those which prevail in Newfoundland to- J day. There was a great supply of game which

\ was rapidly being killed off, but the people of

i Maine, by wise legislation, by the appointment of a commission of good men, and by giving into the hands of these men plenty of power, were enabled to check the destruction, and to-day Maine has a great and valuable supply of fish and game, which each year bring large sums of money into the State.

The fish and game of any country are among its most valuable resources ; and this is especially true of a sparsely settled country. If abundant, the game and fish attract into the country a class of men who have money to spend, and who usually are free in spending it. They offer em¬ ployment to guides, boatmen and others, at a season when such men might otherwise be idle , and what is more important, they pay their em¬ ployees in cash upon the spot. In such coun¬ tries it is certainly for the advantage of every * man who desires employment in the woods or on the streams that the game and the fish should be preserved; and it is much more easy to pre- serve game that already exists than to let such game be destroyed and then try to replace it by that brought from other quarters.

It is greatly to be hoped that before long New¬

momentary pleasure and nothing of other men or of the future. Such men are found in New¬ foundland as wanton butchers of the deer, and they are reported to come there from other lands, from Europe and from the United States, and to slaughter deer and fish without reason and in violation of statutes and good morals alike. Re¬ ports of such happenings have frequently been spread abroad since sportsmen began to go into Newfoundland, and while there may be exagger¬ ation in the reports, there is probably some foun¬ dation for them. It is human nature to regard offenses against the law by foreigners as. much more serious than if committed by the natives of any place, and if excessive slaughter is attributed to Englishman or to American, it tends to make such foreigners unpopular with the residents of Newfoundland, and, in the eyes of many people there, justifies special legislation against nonresi¬ dent sportsmen. This is an especial reason if one s desire to retain his own self resnect were not rea¬ son enough— why visiting sportsmen should ob¬ serve the laws affecting game and fish.

TO PROPAGATE QUAIL AND GROUSE.

Interest in the propagation and increase of those wild species which once filled the whole land and have now in many places become so scarce is growing far more rapidly than most people believe. Scattered over the United States are experiment stations or game farms wheie State officials are conducting experiments in the domestication and acclimatization of various birds and animals, and not a few private individuals are at work in the same field. Their success is varying, for as yet all this work is experimental.

Who would have believed a few years ago that an institution founded for the promotion of pure science would be willing to expend its funds for the purpose of increasing the game supply, and yet this is just what has been done. Two or three days ago Dr. Clifton F. Hodge, of Clark’s University, received $500 from the Car¬ negie Institution “to be expended in the domesti¬ cation and study of the native grouse and quail.

The extraordinary success attained by Dr. Hodge in the domestication of the ruffed grouse is very well known. He has had experience in this matter greater probably than any other man, and his interest in it is most active. In addition to this grant by the Carnegie Institution, Dr. Hodge has recently had voted for the same pur¬ pose a grant of $200 by the Massachsuetts Fish and Game Association.'

It is very gratifying that a vast institution like

THE WARDENS.

There are many truths in Warden Harry Chase’s communication, in another column. War¬ dens we must